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Care and Upkeep Let's face it, it has to be done. Have questions of what to do or how to do it, this is the place to talk about it.

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  #1  
Old 03-04-2019
tsdevane tsdevane is online now
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Default Bird Nest at Home

I don’t think that anyone would disagree that keeping a Bird garaged is better that not keeping it garaged. My plans have always been to garage my Bird (to be) at my current residence. Although not presently Bird habitable, my garage is a nice structure (48’ X 36’). My plans were to add a 20’ wide, 48’ long 16’ high fully enclosed “lean to” on the back side for my Bird. None of my Bird Nest’s design iterations included my future Bird residing anywhere except at my house; this may change. Nothing negative thank God, but nothing to do with this thread.

At home you have constant regulated power (back-up whole house generator), the security of knowing your Bird is in a safe environment, and the convenience of loading and unloading at home base. The only negative I can think about having a Bird at home base would be neighbors knowing when you’re coming and going – which may not be an issue in all situations.

My common sense perspective is to keep the Bird at home; I hope it is possible. I am sure there are additional things to consider, but not actually owning a Bird, at this point I don’t even know what I don’t know. Whether positive or negative, I would appreciate any input/comments of your experiences on this subject.

To the Administrators/Moderators - If this thread is not placed in the correct category, please relocate it accordingly.


Timothy
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Timothy DeVane
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(H) 336-66TWO-8333
(M) 336-33NINE-8033
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  #2  
Old 03-04-2019
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Chief607 Chief607 is offline
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Timothy, You might consider having a power source, access to hooking up water, and maybe even sewer access. None of this is absolute but it has sure come in handy for us if we are working on anything to do with this resources.
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  #3  
Old 03-04-2019
tsdevane tsdevane is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief607 View Post
Timothy, You might consider having a power source, access to hooking up water, and maybe even sewer access. None of this is absolute but it has sure come in handy for us if we are working on anything to do with this resources.
I agree John - any, or all would be an asset!



PS - I know you can't wait to get your Bird back after the renovation. We are all waiting to see the pictures of the finished product.

Timothy
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Timothy DeVane
Greensboro, NC
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(H) 336-66TWO-8333
(M) 336-33NINE-8033
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  #4  
Old 03-05-2019
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max hendrix max hendrix is offline
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I keep my bus at home inside my workshop and it is great with just a couple of drawbacks.
First the good ;

Very safe and convenient.

Easy to work on those little things that always need work.

No rent money spent —— offset this with upkeep / insurance/ taxes on building.

Keep it plugged in all the time so the refrigerator always has a cold drink available if I’m mowing or working in shop etc.

I can pull it out and wash a little bit at a time

Air compressor is ready when it’s time to check the tires before a trip.

Save money by doing my own oil changes and lots of other maintenance.

The Texas sun is BRUTAL. I wouldn’t own an RV here unless I could park it inside.

Nice quiet place to escape to when I need some down time.

Negative ;

Takes up a lot of the floor space of my workshop.

I like to cut and weld and grind and paint things. Have to be very careful to avoid overspray, chips, welding spatter etc from damaging bus. I usually just pull it outside if I plan to do any of that kind of work.

My building doesn’t have a big door on the street side so I have to drive across the grass around back to get inside. My yard is full of ruts I also have lots of moles so I try to drive over them and maybe smash them flat !!!!


Additional Thoughts ;

I have a septic system so I don’t dump into that. If I was on city sewer, I would put in a dump station receptacle

I keep a pretty irregular schedule because of my work so I really don’t worry too much about the neighbors. But I do try to be somewhat discreet with my loading and leaving home. I also don’t post on FB or other forums when I will be gone


Good Luck with your decision.
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  #5  
Old 03-05-2019
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NoGas NoGas is offline
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Default Bird House Planning

Agree with above. When the bus was new (to me) it was kept in a storage yard and also for awhile inside a non-cooled wharehouse “Hot Box” storage. In AZ both were bad in the summer. Is night and day having my own space! When working on project, I love the convenience of being able to drop everything and pick up right where I left off the next day. If I wake up middle of the night and want to work on something, the shop and coach are ready anytime. When inside, the coach stays clean and dust free. Having the epoxy floor really helps with that. When it’s a brutal 115 degrees in the summer - thanks to house solar (9.2 Kw) & AC, I keep the garage at a comfortable 78 and still end up with a zero $$ electric bill. LOVE that! You have seen the Bird House series. That’s just one persons way of getting it done. Lots went into the planning part for the Birdhouse. Here’s my shortlist of considerations, most and more were discussed and addressed in the Birdhouse thread. Didn’t get all of them but am very happy with the end result:

Will the Bird fit? - height, width, length (bigger space is better )
Garage should accommodate length of largest bus conversion + 10’
Ideally a Jeep or toy trailer should fit behind or beside the coach
Garage width should allow coach bay doors to fully open + 2’ min each side to walk
Slab must support weight of heaviest Bird or a 45’ Prevost conversion
Position 50a/water/sewer/house cable connections on wall/floor for coach
Air conditioning for entire garage, including insulated walls, doors and double pane windows - this is perhaps the most appreciated item!
Built in/switched big louvered exhaust fan extracts coach exhaust when parked & clears garage of fumes fast when pulling into garage
Laundry tub for parts cleaning
Ceiling lighting sufficient - 8 twin tube 48” fixtures minimum above bus
120VAC outlets along side walls every 8’
Able to position deep tandem car bay opposite coach entry door when backed in
Deep tandem car bay should have extra outlets and a 30a for power equipment and work area/bench
If air desired, compressor positioned at back of coach bay + 30a + air lines to tandem bay/shop
Water - outside faucet bibs at front and rear plus an inside bib for filling coach tank with soft water
Full rollup door at front of coach bay with smaller rollup at rear, both on electric openers - can back coach in without getting out, just like a car!
Able to back coach straight into garage from street
Flecked epoxy coat over entire garage floor and baseboards
Not done due to city! - a Pit
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  #6  
Old 03-05-2019
MOConnor MOConnor is offline
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This is one thing to consider , but not a deal breaker on buying a bird for sure.


There is a good chance that you will damage your driveway.
At different times of the year the ground can play havoc on any driveway surface, including gravel.

Wet ground will be a sponge and will be week.
Frost will raise a drive surface.
When the frost starts to go back down the drive will go down slower, leaving a cavity between the foundatin and your driveway
You will see immediate damage.
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1984 PT 35 Gone fishing
1987 PT 40 Wayward wind
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  #7  
Old 03-05-2019
MOConnor MOConnor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOConnor View Post
This is one thing to consider , but not a deal breaker on buying a bird for sure.


There is a good chance that you will damage your driveway.
At different times of the year the ground can play havoc on any driveway surface, including gravel.

Wet ground will be a sponge and will be week.
Frost will raise a drive surface.
When the frost starts to go back down the drive will go down slower, leaving a cavity between the foundatin and your driveway
You will see immediate damage.
I see that frost will not be an issue for you
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Novi, Michigan
1984 PT 35 Gone fishing
1987 PT 40 Wayward wind
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  #8  
Old 03-05-2019
tsdevane tsdevane is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 407
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by max hendrix View Post
I keep my bus at home inside my workshop and it is great with just a couple of drawbacks.
First the good ;

Very safe and convenient.

Easy to work on those little things that always need work.

No rent money spent —— offset this with upkeep / insurance/ taxes on building.

Keep it plugged in all the time so the refrigerator always has a cold drink available if I’m mowing or working in shop etc.

I can pull it out and wash a little bit at a time

Air compressor is ready when it’s time to check the tires before a trip.

Save money by doing my own oil changes and lots of other maintenance.

The Texas sun is BRUTAL. I wouldn’t own an RV here unless I could park it inside.

Nice quiet place to escape to when I need some down time.

Negative ;

Takes up a lot of the floor space of my workshop.

I like to cut and weld and grind and paint things. Have to be very careful to avoid overspray, chips, welding spatter etc from damaging bus. I usually just pull it outside if I plan to do any of that kind of work.

My building doesn’t have a big door on the street side so I have to drive across the grass around back to get inside. My yard is full of ruts I also have lots of moles so I try to drive over them and maybe smash them flat !!!!


Additional Thoughts ;

I have a septic system so I don’t dump into that. If I was on city sewer, I would put in a dump station receptacle

I keep a pretty irregular schedule because of my work so I really don’t worry too much about the neighbors. But I do try to be somewhat discreet with my loading and leaving home. I also don’t post on FB or other forums when I will be gone

Quote:
Originally Posted by max hendrix View Post
Good Luck with your decision.

Hi Max...

Thank you for sharing your perspective. All of your comments were noted.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NoGas View Post
Agree with above. When the bus was new (to me) it was kept in a storage yard and also for awhile inside a non-cooled wharehouse “Hot Box” storage. In AZ both were bad in the summer. Is night and day having my own space! When working on project, I love the convenience of being able to drop everything and pick up right where I left off the next day. If I wake up middle of the night and want to work on something, the shop and coach are ready anytime. When inside, the coach stays clean and dust free. Having the epoxy floor really helps with that. When it’s a brutal 115 degrees in the summer - thanks to house solar (9.2 Kw) & AC, I keep the garage at a comfortable 78 and still end up with a zero $$ electric bill. LOVE that! You have seen the Bird House series. That’s just one persons way of getting it done. Lots went into the planning part for the Birdhouse. Here’s my shortlist of considerations, most and more were discussed and addressed in the Birdhouse thread. Didn’t get all of them but am very happy with the end result:

Will the Bird fit? - height, width, length (bigger space is better )
Garage should accommodate length of largest bus conversion + 10’
Ideally a Jeep or toy trailer should fit behind or beside the coach
Garage width should allow coach bay doors to fully open + 2’ min each side to walk
Slab must support weight of heaviest Bird or a 45’ Prevost conversion
Position 50a/water/sewer/house cable connections on wall/floor for coach
Air conditioning for entire garage, including insulated walls, doors and double pane windows - this is perhaps the most appreciated item!
Built in/switched big louvered exhaust fan extracts coach exhaust when parked & clears garage of fumes fast when pulling into garage
Laundry tub for parts cleaning
Ceiling lighting sufficient - 8 twin tube 48” fixtures minimum above bus
120VAC outlets along side walls every 8’
Able to position deep tandem car bay opposite coach entry door when backed in
Deep tandem car bay should have extra outlets and a 30a for power equipment and work area/bench
If air desired, compressor positioned at back of coach bay + 30a + air lines to tandem bay/shop
Water - outside faucet bibs at front and rear plus an inside bib for filling coach tank with soft water
Full rollup door at front of coach bay with smaller rollup at rear, both on electric openers - can back coach in without getting out, just like a car!
Able to back coach straight into garage from street
Flecked epoxy coat over entire garage floor and baseboards
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoGas View Post
Not done due to city! - a Pit
Van...

I have read the Bird House Series, and now have read it again. I and anyone else with good sense will benefit from your build project. As always, the details make the difference - thank you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MOConnor View Post
This is one thing to consider , but not a deal breaker on buying a bird for sure.


There is a good chance that you will damage your driveway.
At different times of the year the ground can play havoc on any driveway surface, including gravel.

Wet ground will be a sponge and will be week.
Frost will raise a drive surface.
When the frost starts to go back down the drive will go down slower, leaving a cavity between the foundatin and your driveway
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOConnor View Post
You will see immediate damage.
Martin...

Though the driveway upkeep is a consideration, it will not be a deciding factor as to whether or not to purchase a Bird. I appreciate you mentioning this nonetheless.





Since we are not in a subdivision, and there are no restrictive covenants, I never considered not to "nest at home." Since the plan is to travel, my wife and I have engaged in conversation about downsizing. We have never not considered having a home base. We just don't believe we need 3,000 sqft of house on four acres. There are a lot of considerations since we will be retiring soon. We will not be restricted to staying anywhere in particular. Our decisions will be personal, but since we plan to engage in the travel lifestyle, any input is welcomed.


Timothy
__________________
Timothy DeVane
Greensboro, NC
Future Owner

(H) 336-66TWO-8333
(M) 336-33NINE-8033
Please email Private Messages
(E) timothy@devane.net

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-05-2019
MOConnor MOConnor is offline
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Location: Novi
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A home base could be a drive in drive out garage/ warehouse.
Some people I have talked with rented out there home and used the garage on the property.
Having additional income for the yearly and future maintenance.
This amount for maintenance will very from 3,000 to 15,000 per year , with many variables .

Having a home base in some states will greatly reduce the plate fee.
Here in Michigan it is well over a thousand for the year.
In Wyoming much less.
Some state go on age of vehicle and charge under 100.00

For me it is worth every dollar and hour I spend on it.

It did however put a temporary strain on my marriage .
But I will recover as soon as I finish my kitchen project
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Novi, Michigan
1984 PT 35 Gone fishing
1987 PT 40 Wayward wind
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  #10  
Old 03-05-2019
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Mikenjackie Mikenjackie is offline
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We're planning a Bird Nest, just as soon as we decide where to buy land, so this thread is very interesting & informative.
One of my "must haves" is a pit so I can get under the coach to work on her without the fear of being squished! I would think if the pit was incorporated into the original build for the nest, it shouldn't cost too much more. Has anybody done this, and have any advice?
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