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Generators In this forum we will try to answer any of your questions about the different model generators that can be found on Blue Bird coach's.

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  #21  
Old 1 Week Ago
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jimbonich jimbonich is offline
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I replaced the 220v fan when I bought my coach 9 years ago and again a year ago, with a capacitor replacement in between. (ALWAYS check the capacitor first--if you can start the fan running by manually spinning it then that's probably your problem) (be very careful or have a relative you don't like that much assist with this).

IMHO 220v is better when available. If you use/carry a 12v fan as a replacement, you will probably need to search local outlets or order one with enough cfm to diffuse the heat output. 220 definitely flows a lot of air, but a 12v fan beats the heck out of no genny.

I would also suggest keeping the coach high enough where the airflow exiting underneath the coach isn't block by tall grass and low clearance.

With either setup, but especially with the 12v unit, make sure you block off any gaps that allow airflow to escape without going through the remote radiator. When I had to switch to a 12v fan when my 220v unit died at a skydiving event, raising the coach height and taping off the gaps between the fan shroud and the radiator made the difference between the marginal 12v fan I was able to obtain locally on a weekend keeping up and the generator overheating. The 220v fan keeps the temp at 165 degrees under any load or outside temp so it's my first choice but I carry a spare capacitor and a spare 12v fan
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  #22  
Old 1 Week Ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbonich View Post
I replaced the 220v fan when I bought my coach 9 years ago and again a year ago, with a capacitor replacement in between. (ALWAYS check the capacitor first--if you can start the fan running by manually spinning it then that's probably your problem) (be very careful or have a relative you don't like that much assist with this).

IMHO 220v is better when available. If you use/carry a 12v fan as a replacement, you will probably need to search local outlets or order one with enough cfm to diffuse the heat output. 220 definitely flows a lot of air, but a 12v fan beats the heck out of no genny.

I would also suggest keeping the coach high enough where the airflow exiting underneath the coach isn't block by tall grass and low clearance.

With either setup, but especially with the 12v unit, make sure you block off any gaps that allow airflow to escape without going through the remote radiator. When I had to switch to a 12v fan when my 220v unit died at a skydiving event, raising the coach height and taping off the gaps between the fan shroud and the radiator made the difference between the marginal 12v fan I was able to obtain locally on a weekend keeping up and the generator overheating. The 220v fan keeps the temp at 165 degrees under any load or outside temp so it's my first choice but I carry a spare capacitor and a spare 12v fan
I had the same experience. The 12V fan worked fine in most situations, but on a hot KY summer day, it would not cool well enough with three air conditioners running. I needed to fabricate a fan shroud, but not having Randy's expertise at this, I went back to the 220V fan which had a shroud and pushed a little more air. The large amp draw for the 12V was another factor and I wasn't smart enough to use the hour meter for an automatic start instead of waiting for the thermostat to kick the fan on.
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  #23  
Old 1 Week Ago
ArlinV ArlinV is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiwi3 View Post
Arlin, when you say 'fan breaker' do you mean the 2.5 AMP push to reset breaker or are you referring to the larger 70 AMP breakers in tandem?

My 2.5AMP had broken off the housing as well and was rattling around in there. I replaced it with a different part number, but identical specification breaker from E-T-C (original manufacturer). It was $20 + shipping. Only difference I saw on the outside was that the new one had the AMPs printed on the push-to-reset and the old one had it printed on the side of the breaker.
E-T-A Circuit Protection and Control 2-5700-IG1-P10-2.5A , Circuit Breaker; Therm; Push; Cur-Rtg 2.5A; Panel; 1 Pole; Vol-Rtg 250/28VAC/VDC

Granted looking at the PowerTech wiring it is supposed to be a 4 AMP breaker and I'm guessing Wanderlodge sized it down for some reason so I stuck with the 2.5 AMP.

My generator also has a dual pole switch that powers the fan. It appears that L1 and L3 just feed into the switch on and then out to the fan. The circuit diagram does not show the wiring to the fan motor though.
Bruce,

I’m referring to the dual pole breaker that powers the fan. I don’t know the amperage of the original, but Powertech has 10 and 15 amp on their website. Their tech support suggested the 15 amp.
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  #24  
Old 1 Week Ago
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gcyeaw gcyeaw is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alvahall View Post
I had the same experience. The 12V fan worked fine in most situations, but on a hot KY summer day, it would not cool well enough with three air conditioners running. I needed to fabricate a fan shroud, but not having Randy's expertise at this, I went back to the 220V fan which had a shroud and pushed a little more air. The large amp draw for the 12V was another factor and I wasn't smart enough to use the hour meter for an automatic start instead of waiting for the thermostat to kick the fan on.
I used the 'RUN' light circuit to trigger the relay for the fan. That way the fan doesn't draw any power until the generator is started. Since the fan draws 20+ amps, that is a big load on the gen start battery during startup. (Run light pin 53 [blue wire] on control box terminal strip)

However, the Hour Meter line may be from the run light line, I am not sure.
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Last edited by gcyeaw; 1 Week Ago at 05:08 PM.
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