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Tires, Wheels, Brakes, Steering and Suspensions Discussion of preventative/corrective maintenance and other technical issues regarding your coach's Tires, Wheels, Brakes, Steering and Suspensions and related components.

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Old 04-08-2008
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Default KONI FSD Self Adjusting Shocks & KONI Adjustable Shocks, Procedure & Part Numbers



Rebound Adjustment Procedure

Some shocks can be adjusted while still on the vehicle by removing the lower nut and compressing the shock fully from underneath. If you can do this, follow the instructions below, bearing in mind that clockwise turns will increase the force in the shock, and counterclockwise turns will decrease it. If there is insufficient room under the vehicle, remove the shock and hold it vertically with the dust cover on top. You may use a vice to hold the bottom attachment. If you do mount the shock in a vice, we recommend you use soft jaws to minimize damage to the shock.
Fully collapse the shock absorber while turning shock slowly counterclockwise until you feel the adjustment nut engage in the recesses of the foot valve assembly. Once the adjustment nut has engaged, it is a good idea to make a mark with a black felt on the dust cover and shock body (to make it easier to keep track of adjustment turns).

The damper may have already been adjusted so gently turn it further to the left counting the half turns until you feel a stop. DO NOT USE FORCE.
If you want to increase the forces, keep the shock absorber collapsed and make a minimum of 1 half-turn (180 degrees) clockwise. In case of prior adjustment add the number of half-turns previously found. The total range is about 5 half-turns.
Pull the shock absorber out vertically without turning for at least 1 cm to disengage the adjusting mechanism. The shock may now be turned freely and reinstalled on the vehicle.
ADJUSTING DIRECTION
Clockwise = Firmer Counter Clockwise = Softer
Koni Adjustability - How it works
Koni shock absorbers have up to 100% reserve damping that can be applied by simple adjustment proce­dures. Through this adjustment, it is possible to compensate for loss of damping force and lengthen the opti­mal service life two to three times.
This adjustment feature can also be used to compensate for added weight on a vehicle.
Unique to Koni, each adjustment position represents increased damping forces over the entire force/velocity range. This feature allows proportionate damping at low and high speeds. Below is a force velocity graph of a Koni shock absorber.
Koni shocks are designed for optimal performance at minimum position, and should be fitted as received. Once you have tested your vehicle, you can modify the damping charac­teristics as necessary.
Remember that adjustments must always be carried out in pairs. Failure to adjust the shocks the same amount on one axle will lead to prob­lems such as uneven tire wear.

More KONI Model shocks adjustment proceedures;
http://www.koni-na.com/adjustment.cfm
contact koni RV



Quote:
Adjustment Procedure 76, 80, 82, 86, 87, 88, 90, 8040, 8240 Series
Quote:
Rebound Adjustment Procedures
Remove the shock absorber from the vehicle and hold it vertically with the lower eye or pin attached in a vise. Use clamp plates to prevent damage.
Fully collapse the shock absorber, at the same time turning the dust cap or piston rod slowly to the left (counterclockwise), until it is felt that the cams of the adjustment nut engage in the recesses of the foot valve assembly.
Some shock absorbers include a bump rubber concealed under the dust cover and it must be removed prior to adjusting.
The damper may have already been adjusted. Therefore check whether the shock absorber is in the adjustment position or not by keeping it collapsed and gently turning it further to the left counting at the same time the half turns until a stop is felt. Stop turning then and do not use force.
Keeping the shock absorber collapsed, make 1 half turn (180 degrees) to the right (clockwise). In case of prior adjustment add the number of half the turns previously found. The total range is about 5 half turns.
Pull the shock absorber out vertically without turning for at least 1 cm to disengage the adjusting mechanism. The dust cap or piston rod may now be turned freely.
ADJUSTING DIRECTION
Clockwise = Firmer
Counter Clockwise = Softer
Quote:
The adjustment procedure took about 45 minutes for the first shock and 10 minutes for the second shock after removing them from the coach. The rubber bushings on both shocks were shot and the shocks were loose on the mounting stud. I found that bushings were available from Koni and I ordered direct from Koni. Koni only sells direct to RV customers, all others have to go through a dealer. So be sure to use the RV products phone number. The bushings are a split bushing using two pieces for each eye, so I ordered 8 bushings for the two shocks.

I found two procedures that I used to adjust the shocks. One was referenced in the John Finn post on this thread. The second was from the Koni website ( http://www.koni-na.com/adjustment.cfm ) which covers several series of shocks. My shocks were series 90, shock part number "90 1968".

Using the directions for the series 90 shocks, I mounted the shock in a vice using wood pieces between the shock lower eye and vice jaws. Then I compressed the shock and slowly rotated the upper portion (dust cap) until the the adjustment cams of the adjustment nut dropped into the recesses of the foot valve assembly (see diagram in procedure). There is slop or dead zone between the clockwise and counterclockwise dust cap position after it drops into the foot valve assembly. The dead zone is where the cap can be rotated without moving the foot valve.

Using a sharpie marker I drew an alignment mark on the cap and base for both the clockwise and counterclockwise dead zone limits. Then, following the procedure, I rotated the cap and located the stop in the counterclockwise direction; which was about 2-1/2 half-turns. Next I rotated the cap and valve back to the original clockwise dead zone alignment line and then located the foot valve stop in the clockwise direction. This turned out to be 2 half-turns. I decided to increase the damping with a clockwise adjustment of 1.5 half-turns from the original clockwise valve setting. After moving the foot valve to the new setting extend the shock until the foot valve is no longer engaged to prevent changing the valve adjustment.

Using the alignment lines for the clockwise and counterclockwise dead zone turned out to give a reproducible original setting of the shock before the foot valve was adjusted. Also, I did not have to remember if the line was for a clockwise or counterclockwise starting point. The position was unique since the lines could only be lined up at the original position providing the original adjustment was not all the way to a stop.

I am waiting for the bushings and have not reinstalled the shocks so I do not know if I reduced the bouncing after a bump.

Dave
'84 'PT35
Huntsville, AL
OTHER RELATED THREADS;

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Wanderlodge Owners Group > Mechanic's Corner > Tires, Brakes, Steering and Suspensions > FC Shock Replacement

Wanderlodge Owners Group > Mechanic's Corner > PT & WB (Twin Axle Pusher Unique Issues) > shock numbers

Try "shox.com" or call them in San Diego. Best prices and will ship. 1-800-
683-2890 $141.00/ will match BB @ $128.14 PLUS $10.00 SHIPPING
Contact Justin McCoy at Koni, His direct number is
(800)922 -2616 X 314.


Koni FSD Self Adjusting Shocks


A Old Wanderlodge Yahoo forum discussion about the new Koni FSD shocks that are the new technology that adjusts automatically. Includes some of the part numbers, for both FC’s and PT’s. Click on link below to take you to the old Yahoo forum message, be sure scroll down to the bottom and read all of the associated messages for more information and warnings.
http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/.../message/13167



Quote:
Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)Summarize MessagesSort by Date#13167From: "freewill2008" <sundance101@comcast.net>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:45 pm
Subject: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)freewill2008
Offline
Send EmailApologies if this ends up posted twice.

As promised, the Koni number for FC rear shocks with air suspension is
9005-1025FSD. The Bluebird part number is 0111675. The price at BB is
around $150.

This shock also fits LX and LXI through 2001.

Bob Griesel '84 FC31 WLII WA

Reply


#13168From: "p_a_lazar" <spambate@whata.com>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:52 pm
Subject: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)p_a_lazar
Offline
Be VERY, VERY careful if you use these shocks on a 97WB. There were
two different shocks specified for the tag axle. One shock is slightly
shorter than the other. If you use the longer of the two, it will
break the shock mounts and do other damage as well. I speak from
experience.

Paul
97wb43

Reply


#13171From: David Brady <dmb993@earthlink.net>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 3:22 pm
Subject: Re: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)davidmbrady2000
Offline
Send EmailThis shock also fits the 2002 and 2003 LXi. And I'd like to
add emphasis to Paul's statement. Measure the fully compressed
length of the shock you're taking off and compare that to
the fully compressed length of the FSD shock. You don't
want the shock to be the bump stop. Make sure the chassis
air bag bump stops engage before the shock is fully compressed.
Over the years firestone airbags gave way to Goodyear, and
Monroe shocks gave way to Koni's and now the Koni FSD.
During these transitions important tolerances have been
impinged upon.

David Brady
'02 LXi, Smokey
NC

Reply


#13169From: "John" <iamflagman@aol.com>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 2:02 pm
Subject: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)flagmannumbe...
Offline
Send EmailBob,

Are these the newer type Konis that are not adjustable? Is that price
of $150.00 per pair? I want to enter this infromation in the FILES
section of the forum, along with the warning that Paul just posted.


"REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11, 2001"
John Finn
'82 35FCRB
BLUEBIRD WANDERLODGE
TO VISIT THE "FINN'S INN EXPRESS" REMODELING ADVENTURE
GO TO;
http://www.pbase.com/image/24977457
HOPKINS, SOUTH CAROLINA


Reply


#13170From: "freewill2008" <sundance101@comcast.net>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 2:18 pm
Subject: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)freewill2008
Offline
Send EmailFSD is the new technology that adjusts automatically. This was
stated by an earlier poster, and mine appear to be non-adjustable
even though the box still says they adjust.

The price is $150 per shock from BB.

Bob

Reply


#13173From: "Fred Hulse" <fhulse@wildblue.net>
Date: Wed Jan 17, 2007 9:02 pm
Subject: Re: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Air (Also LX and LXI)flhulse
Offline
Send EmailPaul
I also have experienced the same consequences regarding the shock mounts.
But have repaired it and the new shocks installed.
Having the number on the old OE shock is important.

Fred & Jeanne Hulse
Morristown Arizona
1997 Wanderlodge PT41

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
it will
break the shock mounts and do other damage as well. I speak from
experience.


Reply


#17201From: "Andy Coleman" <savethebus@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:10 pm
Subject: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Airsavethebus
Offline
Send EmailHello Bob,

Thank you for your January post on Koni rear shocks for FC's with rear
air suspension.

I purchased my 83' FC-35 with Monroe shocks up front. On the drive
home, I quickly realized how much the bird bobbed up and down with
every dip in the road. At times, especially on turns, it was
downright scary!

So for my birds first road trip last week, I replaced the Monroe
shocks with new ones. BIG MISTAKE! The new Monroes were no better -
I did 3,000 miles in a bobbing bluebird! What a sight I must have
been to other vehicles passing by!

I learned my lesson. Next time I'm going to do some homework on this
yahoo group before making a purchase like that... I have since
ordered Koni adjustable 90-2497-SP1 shocks for the front.

I'm also about to order new rear shocks as well. After going through
many posts, there does not seem to be a consensus as to what rear
shocks are the best to buy. Can you tell me how satisfied you are
with the rear 9005-1025FSD shocks you installed last January? I
understand that they are not adjustable. On the rear, is there much
improvement over the stock Gabriels that Bluebird recommends?

Thanks so much! This Yahoo Group is such a fantastic resource!

Andy Coleman
83' FC-35
Spring Lake Heights, NJ


Reply


#17213From: "Rob Robinson" <wander.rob@gmail.com>
Date: Fri Jun 22, 2007 10:57 pm
Subject: Re: Re: Koni Rear For FC With Airtufaw
Offline
Send EmailGood post Andy. Keep us informed please.

Rob, Sue & Merlin Robinson
94 WLWB
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