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Most Frequently Asked Questions About Operating Systems Here you will find some of the most frequently asked questions about the operating systems on a 'Bird. If you have one that you think should be added place it in here.

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  #11  
Old 11-28-2016
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sfedeli sfedeli is offline
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2-3 hours should be sufficient if block heater is working. Use ether- but the key is to have someone spray WHILE you are cranking... (2-man job).

Also, do not start the coach, unless you are going to DRIVE the coach. Starting a diesel and letting it idle is actually worse than not starting it for 3 or 4 months. ALL fluids need to reach temps in excess of 210 degrees for a period of at least a half-hour in order to burn off accumulated moisture.
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  #12  
Old 11-28-2016
bubblerboy64 bubblerboy64 is offline
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Shane, I know that it's been recommended to do as you have said spray as you are cranking up I've never been able to understand the reasoning (with our buses) . Now certainly I DO understand if you were using enough fluid that you might have it pooling and getting too much. When I've done it I've spraying a shot into the air intake and gone back to the driver seat and fired her up. There wouldn't be much difference in that situation. I do understand if you were spraying directly into a carb or right at the intake.

Maybe you could expand on this a little. Am I missing something?
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  #13  
Old 11-28-2016
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As it was explained to me, there are two reasons for not doing this. 1) Ether will explode at relatively low pressures, so before your valves have fully closed, the engine will fire- that could result in valve damage. 2) The accumulation of fumes in the engine compartment could result in a violent explosion of a battery cable arcs or a spark originates from another source.

Not everyone knows how much is enough... so some folks will blast away with the ether until it's running down the throat of the intake. A few quick snorts are all that is required in most cases.
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  #14  
Old 11-28-2016
mpierce mpierce is offline
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Yep. Don't use too much.
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  #15  
Old 11-28-2016
Friday1 Friday1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfedeli View Post
As it was explained to me, there are two reasons for not doing this. 1) Ether will explode at relatively low pressures, so before your valves have fully closed, the engine will fire- that could result in valve damage. 2) The accumulation of fumes in the engine compartment could result in a violent explosion of a battery cable arcs or a spark originates from another source.

Not everyone knows how much is enough... so some folks will blast away with the ether until it's running down the throat of the intake. A few quick snorts are all that is required in most cases.
Cranking speed is everything starting a cold diesel. By letting the motor crank for a second, before shooting ether into the intake, you should be still cranking fast when you do hit the ether. If you start with a shot of ether already in there, it can damage the engine.

Rick in Ohio
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  #16  
Old 11-28-2016
bubblerboy64 bubblerboy64 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Friday1 View Post
Cranking speed is everything starting a cold diesel. By letting the motor crank for a second, before shooting ether into the intake, you should be still cranking fast when you do hit the ether. If you start with a shot of ether already in there, it can damage the engine.

Rick in Ohio
Ok and I guess depending on the position of the valves that could happen. Makes sense. I would think spraying at the top of the air intake at the level of the roof you'd be pretty safe. Problem is what do you do if you're by yourself? I've only had to resort to ether once as I recall.
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  #17  
Old 11-28-2016
Friday1 Friday1 is offline
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Ether is some dangerous stuff. I have seen an NA 7.3 International motor with the crankshaft three-pieced. The center two throws of the crank and the block webbing broken out. This is an example of More's Law- a little ether is good, more's better. I once drove a ladder truck with an intermittent bad cam sensor across town about 3-4 miles on ether. Had to move it away from a big fire and it wouldn't start. Not recommended for engine longevity but no choice in this case. This 8V92 would start but would stop when the cam sensor got warm. I had an assistant spraying ether straight into the turbo but at a maintenance level just to keep the motor running at about 35 mph so we could get it to our shop.

Rick in Ohio
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  #18  
Old 11-28-2016
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LiminDaze LiminDaze is offline
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I'm glad this topic came up. Although my 1991 owners manual says the engine heater switch is under the sink, there is none. But there is a Battery heat switch although I cannot figure out how the batteries are actually heated. I do have an engine preheat switch in the upper cabinet over the drivers side as well as a cold start switch on the lower right dash as well as an "eng. preheat" switch located upper left dash (next to the altimeter).

So my question is, on cold mornings like I just experienced in PA, what switch do I use to heat the motor?

Needless to say I'm a bit confused of what buttons to push if I need to pre-heat the motor. Any guidance is GREATLY appreciated!

Thanks,
Andy
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Last edited by LiminDaze; 11-28-2016 at 07:41 PM.
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  #19  
Old 11-28-2016
konehd konehd is offline
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Do you have primus heat?

You can use that for preheat, and in reverse to heat the coach and hot water over the road...

Heres a cheat sheet. Not all functions work on all coaches though!

I have primus _and_ electric engine preheat, you might too.



HTH, Joe
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  #20  
Old 11-28-2016
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LiminDaze LiminDaze is offline
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Joe,
Thanks for the reply. The primus was replaced years ago with a webasto but that hasn't worked for the past few years.

My issue is figuring out which of the 4 similar buttons (or combination of buttons) to use to get the motor started on cold mornings.

Thanks,
Andy
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