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Tires, Wheels, Brakes, Steering and Suspensions Discussion of preventative/corrective maintenance and other technical issues regarding your coach's Tires, Wheels, Brakes, Steering and Suspensions and related components.

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  #1  
Old 02-15-2010
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yesmar yesmar is offline
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Unhappy Lucky I made it home

About 10 days after I made it home from Q, I discovered oil on the cement that was coming from between the duals on the passenger side. This morning I took it to a truck repair place, thinking it would only need seals. However, when they pulled the hub from the axle, one of the bearings fell apart and there was metal shreds everywhere. Of course the brake shoes have a thick coat of oil on them.

In looking at it, I am lucky to have made it to Q and even luckier to have made it home.

I will be pulling the other side to replace that seal and check the brakes. Then I plan on draining, cleaning and completely replacing the rear end grease as well as that brake pad on the passenger side.

What else should we look for on an 84,000 mile coach?

I am beginning to wonder if there is anything on this coach that isn't worn out. I had to replace everything on my diesel heating system at Q, because it all was worn out. I am a believer that a coach will deteriorate quicker sitting up out side than rolling down the road. Therefore, beware of older coaches with low miles.

Hopefully my coach will be road worthy by the week end.
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Yesmar@fairpoint.net
Eight 5 zero four four 7 one 7 zero zero
1994 Wanderlodge (sold)
2000 LXI (sold)
1993 Wanderlodge(Sold)
2004 M380 (FOR SALE)
1997 Marathon
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  #2  
Old 02-15-2010
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gcyeaw gcyeaw is offline
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I think much of the problem is that everything on a coach has a specified mainenance/inspection schedule. I know I don't have one for mine, and I suspect most don't have one for theirs. I do check things out, but it is not a real in-depth inspection every time, and I may be missing some things. Rear axel seals and bearings should last more that 84k, but the coach may have been towed and the axels pulled at one time. Sloppy handling and dirt or other junk could have been introduced.

Of course, there is the chassis and then the coach, two different animals. I'll bet if I search the documents on this site I might find chassis maintenance schedules for my 83FC. If not it would probably be on some School bus site.
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  #3  
Old 02-15-2010
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Richard,

Normally, it is recommended to replace both brakes on an axle and not to just replace one side. I believe the stear axle would be more sensitive. Probably be hard pressed to get much difference on the drive axle if they are adjusted correctly. But since you are in there anyway, the only difference in price should be the cost of the shoes.

Regards,

Glenn
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  #4  
Old 02-15-2010
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Randy Dupree Randy Dupree is offline
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brakes are cheap for a bird,cheaper than car brakes.
But there is many different grades of brakes,get the best,they will perform better and last longer.
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  #5  
Old 02-15-2010
jnxmas jnxmas is offline
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Do not forget to check the break drum's for crack's.
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  #6  
Old 02-16-2010
cmillsap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yesmar View Post
About 10 days after I made it home from Q, I discovered oil on the cement that was coming from between the duals on the passenger side. This morning I took it to a truck repair place, thinking it would only need seals. However, when they pulled the hub from the axle, one of the bearings fell apart and there was metal shreds everywhere. Of course the brake shoes have a thick coat of oil on them.

What else should we look for on an 84,000 mile coach?

.

Richard,

If I remember correctly, you were having an overweight problem on one side of your drive axle. You should check and see if the wheels set that the bearing was destroyed on was the side of the axle that was overweight. Just a thought??

Chuck
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  #7  
Old 02-16-2010
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A couple of issues here. First always have the brakes and all associated parts checked either by yourself or a competent mechanic once a year. If you have a problem on one wheel, leak, noise etc then have the opposite wheel also pulled and check the drums, shoes, S cams,slack adjusters or similar parts on a coach with disk brakes. If you replace shoes(pads) on one wheel then also change the shoes(pads) on the opposite side at the same time.

As for brake drums there is more to check then just for cracks. I would suggest downloading the maintenance manual from Gunite, Bendix etc that has pictures to show the various problems to check for such as hardening of the surface, glazing, martinizing(sp) run out etc. I would wager that a very high percentage of over the road trucks have cracks in the brake drums and are fully servicable. A good maintenance manual will show you the difference.

As for quality of the brake shoes, make sure you get the shoes that were designed for your specific coach as they will have the correct stopping power for the weight etc.

We are driving very heavy coaches and if we are to be safe drivers then each of us should be aware of how to make sure our braking systems and other systems operate at maximum efficiency,
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  #8  
Old 02-16-2010
cmillsap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yesmar View Post


I am beginning to wonder if there is anything on this coach that isn't worn out. I had to replace everything on my diesel heating system at Q, because it all was worn out. I am a believer that a coach will deteriorate quicker sitting up out side than rolling down the road. Therefore, beware of older coaches with low miles.

Hopefully my coach will be road worthy by the week end.

Richard,

I certainly understand your frustration but you'll get it fixed and continue enjoying that beautiful bus. At the risk of hijacking your thread about the damage to your drive axle, I just wanted to respond to something you said above.

A buyer of a motorcoach should not be dissuaded from buying an older coach with low miles. Actually, it’s just the opposite as usage equals wear and everything mechanical is subject to wear. The key to buying a used older coach is determining the frequency of use and where it spent its resting time. Let’s use a 10 year old coach with 50,000 miles on it for example. If 90% of the miles were put on it in the first 5 years and then it set outside for the next 5 years with little or no use, then I might be concerned about it.

Conversely, if the coach was stored inside and had been used on frequent intervals such as 6 to 8 times a year averaging somewhere between 500 & 1000 miles each trip for the 10 years, then you have the best of both worlds, a low mileage coach with very little deterioration from sitting.

Now the best way to determine the frequency of use of a coach is to ask the seller to see his trip log. Most owners maintain a log of their travels as I do. If they don’t, then quiz the seller as to his usage pattern to get an idea of the frequency of use.

So, IMHO, I would much rather buy a 2000 LXi with 41,000 frequently used miles on it (which I did) than a 2000 LXi with high mileage. Just makes common sense to me.

Chuck
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  #9  
Old 02-16-2010
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Crit Bliss Crit Bliss is offline
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Richard, I wouldn't sweat it. A bad bearing doesn't mean your coach is junk, it just means a bearing failed for what ever reason. My coach turns 30 in April and has not lost an axle bearing yet, though the fronts were blued when I decided that they had never been serviced since I owned the coach ( non oil bath variety ) Establish a relationship with a LOCAL truck shop. A good shop will help you with a service schedule. Even with the best service program, though, stuff will fail, be glad it's not a boat.
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  #10  
Old 02-16-2010
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yesmar yesmar is offline
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You are exactly correct about the frequency of use. If a bus is run every 45 to 60 days and everything is brought up to temperature, then that bus will be in good shape even though it has low milleage. I was thinking of a bus that was run the first few years and just sat without being moved the next 5 years. If they sit without being moved for a long period of time, then they probably will be a maintance night mare for a year or three.

With this repair, I should be nearing the point where all moving parts have been replaced. My 94 bird spoiled me. In 5 years, it only went to the shop twice. However, It did have some minor repairs(water pumps, transfer switch,etc.) that I was able to do myself.

Perhaps one reason my 94 did not give me trouble was because I had a bus company service it and they caught a lot of potential problems. Lynx coaches, owned by Carl Moberg, took care of my 94 and I am going to call them when I get to Titusville and have them give my coach a DOT inspection.
I remember Carl saying, "Don't let a truck mechanic work on your coach." Before I bought the 2000 LXI, I sold my place in Titusville and for convenience, I have been having nearby truck mechanics and RV repair places work on it. Hello Carl.
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Yesmar@fairpoint.net
Eight 5 zero four four 7 one 7 zero zero
1994 Wanderlodge (sold)
2000 LXI (sold)
1993 Wanderlodge(Sold)
2004 M380 (FOR SALE)
1997 Marathon
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