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Tool Tips Here you will finds tips on using old tools, as well as the latest in new tools that you can use on your 'Bird's projects.

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  #1  
Old 09-07-2008
gcyeaw's Avatar
gcyeaw gcyeaw is offline
Gardner
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ridgewood
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Default Snap goes the lug bolt

Well, as a favor for working on Tom's antenna he loaned me his x-12 wrench so I could install new beauty rings on the rear of my coach. All went well till I was tightening one of the lug nuts. It gave little resistance and then none. The hollow bolt that holds the inner dual on snapped off. After examining the break it looks like it had been half way gone already.
Now to the task or removing the broken unit. I hear a pipe wrench with a long pipe might work. I was actually thinking along the lines of a truck tire shop.

The other side of the coach has 4 new ones, so I am thinking that this is the result of either previous over tighteneing or just plain fatigue. It would probably be to my advantage to replace them all, at least on the one side.
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  #2  
Old 09-07-2008
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Ed Wimberley Ed Wimberley is offline
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Default Lug nut

Gardner
I recently suffered 2 broken lug nuts. was told to replace ALL on that wheel by 2 different shops. However I still had to drive about 50 miles to get service.Studs about $10.00 each with new nuts.
It can be done by self if you have parts.Place in Dalton Ga is my closest source.
Good luck Ed
If you're close I will assist.
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  #3  
Old 09-07-2008
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Gardner,i guess you know they have lefts and rights on those nuts,inners and outers.
also,i have a speical socket/broken inner nut nut tool,you drive it on and use the x-12 to turn it,or an impact or lug wrench.

i can loan you the socket if you want to try it.
and,i have changed the inner nut with a pipe wrench.
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2000 LXI 43
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  #4  
Old 09-07-2008
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Randy,
I sent you a private message with mailing information. I would like to try the socket. I am looking for a local supplier for the replacement lug nuts, I expect they should not be hard to find.

Gardner
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83FC35 SB $IXTEEN TON$ SOLD
78 FC 33 Happinest (Sold)
Ridgewood, New Jersey
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  #5  
Old 09-07-2008
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Gardner two things you want to remember when using a X12. 1. Turn the nut in the correct direction as Randy said. There will be a R or L on each bolt end. Left to tighten, Right to tighten. 2. Always use a torque wrench when you tighten them set to 450 lbs ft.

One of the first things I bought was the special socket to drive onto the broken bolt so you can remove it. Again make sure you turn it in the correct direction or you will be SOL for good<grin>.

Unless you are going to drive it any distance before the rally in Hershey we can replace all of them there. I buy the inner and outer wheel parts at Prior tire supply http://priertiresupply.com/trucknuts.aspx

In fact I buy extra aluminum wheel valve stems, metal caps etc to make sure I always have some in the coach if needed. Its a lot cheaper to order them there then to pay for them at a tire shop
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  #6  
Old 09-07-2008
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Tom,
What is the corect part number? I am assunming aluminum to aluminum, so I would order #3RS and #3LS for my 1983 FC 35. Right?

I am borrowing a tool to remove the broken part, but here is a refrence in case anyone wants one.
http://priertiresupply.com/part2412-...emoverkit.aspx

There is also a one piece cheaper unit, since I don't expect to need it tht much this one is probably the right one, only one piece to loose.
http://priertiresupply.com/part2515-...utremover.aspx
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Last edited by gcyeaw; 09-08-2008 at 11:24 AM.
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  #7  
Old 09-08-2008
thomase thomase is offline
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I also had a broken lug stud on the rear axle while we were driving some mountain passes in Mexico. We replaced it on the side of the road and another broke while putting the tires back on. Once I was back Home I pulled the hubs off and replaced all studs, lug nuts, bearings and oil seals.

My Bird is 25 years old and I guess those studs can only handle so many fatigue cycles / wear and tear.

Thomas Eastham
Houston, TX
83' FC 35 SB
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  #8  
Old 09-08-2008
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Thomas,
Another thought is the normal sequence of tightening. Not only should you do opposites, you are also supposed to start with maybe 25% of the final torque value, do all the lugs and work up to the final setting in steps. This may allow for slight movement for the allignment of the wheel and the lug nuts in the first step. If you hit the first one at full torque, the opposite one may not shift the wheel fullly into position, and if it does it is put under significant stress to do it. You could end up with uneven pressure on the circumference of the lug nut, leading to undesireable stresses.

All in all, quality manufacturers provide the proper procedures based on solid engineering principals. If these were aeroplanes it could be a felony crime ( I believe) not to follow them. Even though with an X-12 it is a real pain in the neck to hold it up with one hand and swing the wrench with the other, it is probably best to torque it in steps.

As you said, 25 years of stress is good enough reason to replace a pretty cheap item with such a major load bearing responsability.
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86 PT-36 Golden Memories
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78 FC 33 Happinest (Sold)
Ridgewood, New Jersey
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  #9  
Old 09-08-2008
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You need several important tools if you are going to successfully take care of your Stud centered Alcoa aluminum rims.

1. The Alcoa wheel manual http://tinyurl.com/57uhoe and read it!!!

2. A good accurate torque wrench

3. A X12 torque mulitplier or a torque wrench that will go as high as 400 lbs ft.

4. Anti seize

5. motor oil for the wheel studs (read in the manual why)


If you accurately torque the wheel nuts in the correct sequence and slowly work up to 45 lbs ft on the torque wrench connected to the X12 then the studs will last a lifetime UNLESS you let some tire guy torque them with his 1" air wrench and then all bets are off. I also use anti seize or motor oil on the threads and only on the threads and reduce the receommended torque for the wheel studs from 450-500 ft # to 350-400 ft #.

If you dont take care of your wheels they wont take care of you.
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  #10  
Old 09-11-2008
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Well, the new parts arrived today along with the tool to remove the broken stud. I went up to the storage facility, used the leveling jacks to lift the coach up, put the jack stand under for safety, added the hydraulic jack to get the extra inch needed, and proceeded to take off the outer wheel. I hammered the tool onto the broken lug and loosened it with the X-12 wrench. It was not that tough to do, except now, how do I get the old stud out of the tool?

The pictures below show the sequence. I replaced all 10 just because.

One thing I would recommend is to have an adapter to connect an impact wrench to the 1" socket to spin the lug nuts and studs on and off. Using the X-12 is tedious at best. Some of the nuts always seem to be just tough enough to resist turning by hand.

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78 FC 33 Happinest (Sold)
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